Natural born addicts: When mother passes on drug addiction

A study of two opioids used to wean babies born in withdrawal from drugs their mothers have taken shows that buprenorphine is superior to methadone in reducing duration of treatment and length of hospital stay.

pregnancy and addiction

While buprenorphine is often prescribed for pregnant women who are undergoing addiction therapy, a study in Journal of pediatrics is the first report of the drug being used to treat newborns in clinical practice.

Babies born by women who are opioid addicts are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms, a condition known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). 

This study brings light on how to best curb those inherited withdrawal symptoms, tragic as is.

The baby's health is in part a byproduct of mom and dad's health habits and nutritional deficiencies before conceiving. The easiest way to prepare for a healthy kid is to ensure that your health is in peak condition before you bring your dispositions into play - things like the baby's IQ, gut health, immune system and attention span is directly influenced by your health status. And you can boost your health status - nothing is chronic.

The baby's health is in part a byproduct of mom and dad's health habits and nutritional deficiencies before conceiving. The easiest way to prepare for a healthy kid is to ensure that your health is in peak condition before you bring your dispositions into play - things like the baby's IQ, gut health, immune system and attention span is directly influenced by your health status. And you can boost your health status - nothing is chronic.

On another note, it is important to be aware that everything the expecting mother consumes does affect the unborn baby. 

Things such as antibiotics will already dispose the unborn child for a compromised gut health from the get-go, why it is best to avoid these things, especially during pregnancy.

Reference: J Pediatrics. A Cohort Comparison of Buprenorphine versus Methadone Treatment for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. Eric S. Hall et al.